Adventures in the Peak District | Ringing Roger to Grindslow Knoll via Edale

During the May heatwave, it only seemed right to get out to the Peak District for a healthy dose of fresh air and sunlight, and so on the day of the Royal Wedding, we did exactly that. We had a new route in mind, one which encompassed two of my favourite things; a touch of scrambling and magnificent views.

We jumped off the train at Edale station with a swarm of other happy hikers, who dispersed in all directions, and made our way through the quaint little village. The sun beamed down, the birds sang and everything felt so wonderfully lush, from the moss creeping between the old stone walls to the long grasses, tickled by the light breeze. Finally, after what felt like an eternity of cold, grey weather, things were looking up!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Past The Old Nags Head pub, the lane eventually ended and the path lead us under the cool cover of the flourishing woodland surrounding Grindsbrook.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Across the trickling brook and up some steps brought us out into an open field, which was dotted with lambs noisily shadowing their nonchalant mothers. Instead of following the path around to the left, which leads onto the popular scramble of Grindsbrook Clough, we took the steep route to the right and ascended up and around The Nab.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
We were heading to the high point in this photo
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
We took the steep path, instead of the flatter alternative
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Grindsbrook Clough in the distance

As we climbed higher, Edale became smaller, but never disappeared from view.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Eventually we reached the base of Ringing Roger, a series of beautiful wind-blown rock formations, and scrambled to the top for some lunch.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It was then another climb across Golden Clough, which can be accessed along a series of paths, to reach Kinder Plateau.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We followed the single path along Kinder Plateau, drinking in the hazy views across Edale to our left, and Kinder Scout to our right. Though there was a nice breeze up at that height, we could see the hot air rippling across the peat landscape.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This section of the walk was mostly flat, with a number of good viewing spots atop of the rocky escarpment.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Eventually, our path connected with the head of the Grindsbrook Clough scramble route. We crossed over the brook itself, which was completely dry and headed left towards the towering hilltop of Grindslow Knoll.

The panoramic view from the top was sensational and a number of other walkers were strewn across the summit, tucking into packed lunches and sunning themselves. We stopped for a while and watched the paragliders silently riding the air currents across the valley.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The route back to Edale was straightforward and we simply descended the steep path down from Grindslow Knoll, cut across a couple of sheep fields and rejoined the Pennine Way track back into the village.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The circuit was roughly 5 miles in distance and took us a very leisurely four and a half hours to complete (this included numerous breaks to take photos, eat and enjoy the sunshine).

Have you hiked Kinder Scout and surrounds? Do you have any alternate walking route recommendations? Leave a comment and let me know!

Kinder Plateau via Edale
Save me to your Pinterest travel boards!

 

3 Comments Add yours

  1. Oh wow! These photos look absolutely beautiful. I’ve never been to the peak district (or even really thought about it) but I’m so tempted to visit now for a little escape

    https://all-about-the-experience.com/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh Rachel you definitely have to go! It’s absolutely stunning! 😍

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s